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Old 22-12-2009, 05:03   #101
tonyrally
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would just like to add that if the engine is realy full of snotty mayo. and you strugle to get the header tank ect clean. fill it up with water an a cheap bottle of sink an drain unblocker run it for 15 mins with the heaters on full heat then drain via botom rad hose. reffil with coolant always worked for me.....
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Old 03-01-2010, 18:54   #102
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Help!!

Hi All,

Have a 1996 'p' rover 214 16v and my head gasket has gone. I found the step by step guide very useful and have printed it for when i start the work. There was a couple of things i still wasn't sure on, When the new gasket is put on do you need to use any sealant to put it on with?. Is it worth changing the Cambelt at the same time and also can the gaskets just wear over time or is there allways a reason for this.

Thanks
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Old 03-01-2010, 21:54   #103
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Hi guys on here, my fist post on this forum and what a good forum it is, i've had a good look around and there's plenty of good guides and reviews. well impressed... I've been used to scoobynet i had an Sti and this appears better than SN was when i used to frequent it...
Anyhows, I'm here due to having to sort the HG on my mums 414, and reading this excelent guide I've got a couple of qustions that i'm hoping the experienced members on here can put right..
Ok i've done the HG and the car started first time, so was v-happy however i've not run the car up the road as yet as its on a SORN, but i've let it run for 30 mins with fresh cheap oil and oil flush, dropped this and filled with fresh then ran it again for about an hour steady revs upto 5k when it was warmed up..
firstly the top end rattled its tits off, real clattery for about 2 mins this happens each time i start it...
secondly there's loads of water from the exhaust, i put a bucket over the end and there was about 1/2 a cup full in the bottom after say 15 mins...
Is this resedue of water in the system?
I think the rattling is due to the tappets being a bit sludgy i didnt clean them out... Any thoughts...

Also when it took the head off i didnt notice any protrusion of the liners above the bed of the block, it doesnt mention this in the haynes
should there be a slight lip and if so how much?

and lastly can the block seperate from the sump any when the head bolts are out, could i have done anything to prevent this...?

Any thoughts guidance greatly appreciated :-)

oh and i replaced with HG with a MLS decent quality one along with new bolts.

just for info I'm fairly competant having fiddled with a couple of rally cars, and track cars i've had, not done much engine stuff though.
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Old 03-01-2010, 23:25   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesmglue View Post
Hi All,

Have a 1996 'p' rover 214 16v and my head gasket has gone. I found the step by step guide very useful and have printed it for when i start the work. There was a couple of things i still wasn't sure on, When the new gasket is put on do you need to use any sealant to put it on with?. Is it worth changing the Cambelt at the same time and also can the gaskets just wear over time or is there allways a reason for this.

Thanks
Hi James.

You don't require any sealant on the head gasket.

If the cambelt is soon to be due for renewal it makes sense to change the cambelt and tensioner. Also consider fitting a new water pump too as they're ony £16-20 and have been known to fail after having the cambelt disturbed.

The beading in the original gaskets compress and can fail over time but there are also many causes as to why the gasket failed. If fitting the similar SLS (Payen BW750) gasket the gasket should be slightly better than the original. The MLS gasket is totally different.

Regards,
Ian.

Last edited by HotTubRepairer; 04-01-2010 at 00:05. Reason: typo
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Old 04-01-2010, 00:04   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atom-300 View Post
Hi guys on here, my fist post on this forum and what a good forum it is, i've had a good look around and there's plenty of good guides and reviews. well impressed... I've been used to scoobynet i had an Sti and this appears better than SN was when i used to frequent it...
Anyhows, I'm here due to having to sort the HG on my mums 414, and reading this excelent guide I've got a couple of qustions that i'm hoping the experienced members on here can put right..
Ok i've done the HG and the car started first time, so was v-happy however i've not run the car up the road as yet as its on a SORN, but i've let it run for 30 mins with fresh cheap oil and oil flush, dropped this and filled with fresh then ran it again for about an hour steady revs upto 5k when it was warmed up..
firstly the top end rattled its tits off, real clattery for about 2 mins this happens each time i start it...
secondly there's loads of water from the exhaust, i put a bucket over the end and there was about 1/2 a cup full in the bottom after say 15 mins...
Is this resedue of water in the system?
I think the rattling is due to the tappets being a bit sludgy i didnt clean them out... Any thoughts...

Also when it took the head off i didnt notice any protrusion of the liners above the bed of the block, it doesnt mention this in the haynes
should there be a slight lip and if so how much?

and lastly can the block seperate from the sump any when the head bolts are out, could i have done anything to prevent this...?

Any thoughts guidance greatly appreciated :-)

oh and i replaced with HG with a MLS decent quality one along with new bolts.

just for info I'm fairly competant having fiddled with a couple of rally cars, and track cars i've had, not done much engine stuff though.
Hi, I'm glad that you like the forum.

In answer to your questions...

The top end rattle is most likely the tappets, a good drive would usually cure this however it's a little more difficult with a SORN vehicle. If the noise persists you could try some 'Wynns Engine Flush' or 'Wynns hydraulic tappet lifter treatment'.

The water isn't too concerning. The combustion process creates water vapour which would appear to be quite bad if the engine is often at idle. If the coolant level remains correct you have nothing to worry about.

The liners should protrude slightly. The recommended is 4thou (0.004"), the minimum should be about 2thou and the liners should be within 10% of each other for the MLS gasket. If the liners are any lower than 2thou or not within 10% of each other the SLS (Payen BW750) gasket should be fitted.

The cylinder head bolts pass though the head, through the block and into an oil rail/ladder, it's like a giant sandwhich and nothing will seperate if you have only removed the cylinder head. The oil rail is fixed into position.

I hope that helps,
Ian.
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Old 15-01-2010, 10:00   #106
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hi,
i want to save myself a substantial ammount of money and replace my HG, Water Pump and timing belt myself. i would appreciate a full list of tools that i am going to need for this, I do have alot of tools so need to know what extra im going to need.

Alternatively if any of you guys live near or in salford how much would you charge me to do it for me.
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Old 15-01-2010, 11:38   #107
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Probably the only extra tools you will need are an E12 Torx socket for the head bolts, a low range torque wrench (down to 10Nm) and a big breaker bar and socket for the crank pulley bolt. A cam wheel locking tool is handy, but you can do without. Similarly, a crank locking tool is a nice to have.
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Old 21-01-2010, 13:50   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HotTubRepairer View Post
Hi, I'm glad that you like the forum.

In answer to your questions...

The top end rattle is most likely the tappets, a good drive would usually cure this however it's a little more difficult with a SORN vehicle. If the noise persists you could try some 'Wynns Engine Flush' or 'Wynns hydraulic tappet lifter treatment'.

The water isn't too concerning. The combustion process creates water vapour which would appear to be quite bad if the engine is often at idle. If the coolant level remains correct you have nothing to worry about.

The liners should protrude slightly. The recommended is 4thou (0.004"), the minimum should be about 2thou and the liners should be within 10% of each other for the MLS gasket. If the liners are any lower than 2thou or not within 10% of each other the SLS (Payen BW750) gasket should be fitted.

The cylinder head bolts pass though the head, through the block and into an oil rail/ladder, it's like a giant sandwhich and nothing will seperate if you have only removed the cylinder head. The oil rail is fixed into position.

I hope that helps,
Ian.
Nice one chief :-) I'll get on with it once its a bit warmer in my garage.. !!
cheers
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Old 21-01-2010, 23:13   #109
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Show stoppers...

The pics in this thread have been a great help in inspiring me to try to extend the life on my 14yr old 414i which had a leaking head gasket.
I've bought an new MLS gasket kit, but the old head seems badly pitted towards the outer edge of the mating face (coolant to atmosphere interface). What causes this? It is appalling. I would have thought the head would be scrap, but the pits have clearly been present for some time. Do you think I should try the older-type elastomer gasket to eek out some more life? Could I try some metal epoxy like JB weld in the pits? Should I still try to use the viton-steel shim that comes with the MLS gasket as it looks as though it is designed to stick all over, so might seal better on the head than the elastomer gasket directly?

How do people clean the head and deck back to shiny alloy? Can a fine cutting paste be used? I seem to have a mineral-like deposit in parts that just won't shift having tried water, steam, white spirit, and plus-gas so far on nylon pan scourers. Why do people skim a flat head to clean it up, when you can't do the same to the deck? Does a pitted block deck mean a scrap engine?

Jebel

P.S.
Other observations so far:
The heated inlet manifold, isn't exactly "heated" is it, as coolant doesn't flow into it.

I did not need to take off the camshaft sprockets, or the rear timing cover --- they all came off with the head.

The tensioner pulley bolt was insanely tight. I really thought I would shear the poor tiny thing. I needed a breaker bar and a bicycle seat tube acting as an extension to crack it.
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Old 29-01-2010, 18:48   #110
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Please can someone help me ordering on ebay all the needed stuff to do a good job? I found some head gasket sets, but I can't understand if they are genuine sets or not!

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ROVER-UPRATED-...item2ea9ea3071

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/HEAD-GASKET-SE...item4ceadd38c5

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/MGF-MGTF-MGZR-...item35a574a304
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Old 29-01-2010, 21:48   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miky060 View Post
Please can someone help me ordering on ebay all the needed stuff to do a good job? I found some head gasket sets, but I can't understand if they are genuine sets or not!

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ROVER-UPRATED-...item2ea9ea3071

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/HEAD-GASKET-SE...item4ceadd38c5

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/MGF-MGTF-MGZR-...item35a574a304
The chances are that none of them will be top quality sets. Many people have used the MLS gaskets from eBay with varying results, some are perfectly fine wheras others have leaked almost instantly. One thing to definately avoid are those awful head bolts.

If you want to be 100% certain that you're buying top quality parts you need to buy branded items. Payen are one of the leading manufacturers, also you could buy the newer MLS kit supplied by X-part which is now fitted to the N-series engine found in the new MG TF. http://www.rimmerbros.co.uk/Item--i-ZUA000530
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Old 30-01-2010, 11:48   #112
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Are these ok?

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...tchlink:top:en

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Rover-MGF-Land...item518eb2925b


What else do I need?
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Old 30-01-2010, 12:46   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miky060 View Post
They'll be fine. It's the same seller that I used for my bolts they're cheap and quick.

1) Waterpump (if it hasn't been changed before)
2) Timing belt and tensioner (if it's due or getting close)
3) Inlet manifold Gasket - green
4) Exhaust Manifold Gasket (might be able to use the old one again but while it's off fit a new one)
5) Camshaft oil seals
6) Anerobic sealant for sealing the camshaft carrier after having the head skimmed
7) Oil + filter
8) Coolant

....I've probably missed a few things.
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Old 08-02-2010, 05:12   #114
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I expect that it has already been posted somewhere, but there is another good guide to head gasket change here covering the MGF VVC engine.
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Old 26-03-2010, 21:06   #115
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FEEDBACK

I like the cardboard under the car idea as the water on the floor, could be from many sources including my dogs pee lol.... I find that the engine water is a common area of checking check check and more check on K-Series engines! BUT the best time to check the water is only when the engine is totally COLD... as thats when the coolant level is only clear and correct... Also `RADWELD' is useless and to be totally clear never the answer to water problems...! KEEP the antifreezer fresh and mixed correctly, it looks great in the expansion tank all GREEN and lovely... I see some tanks that look as heathy as the `TITANIC HULL' not very at all....

I feel the best way to look after a K-Series engine is not like a modern engine, I mean check the levels once a year, MORE the best way is to check the level every day, like we brush our teeth... AND as you say get any issues checked out like hurting teeth, straight away! That way all goes well with our HAPPY K-Series engines... Boy they do PURRRRRRR!
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Old 25-07-2010, 11:28   #116
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Head Gasket Repair for a Rover K16 (1.8 K-series) engine, with V.V.C.

This article is (still) under construction, but has been restored from its past version.

Before I start I would like to thank the forum members for all their help, support and advice based on real experience.

In particular, I would like to thank 3 people, without whomb this head gasket repair 'project' would probably be suffering from disaster;

ZS
For taking a day off work and assisting in the collection of the car, for sharing his mechanical know-how and for spending many hours of his time helping with all the physical repair work done to the car, lending many of his own tools to do it!

revdpeter3rd
For his time and patience and ability to push 1.2tons of paperweight when most required! Also for giving up his weekends to get his hands dirty!

620Turbo
For his endless hours of input, and sharing of his vast knowledge about the K-Series engine and his experiances with the repair work.

All of these gentleman have put up with my ranting and silly questions and kept the course straight and true - thank you!

For those interested in reading the forum discussions about the subject.

Head Gasket Failure and Repair Through The Eyes of a Leyman

Where does one begin? At the beginning I suppose!

How do I know the car has had a Head Gasket Failure (HGF)? A substance frequently described as 'mayonnaise' in the oil filler cap is a very good sign, as is the loss of oil and/or coolant (water) from the engine.

The rising of engine temperatures is a good indication of something going wrong, if you notice this happening, its worth checking the filler cap and coolant levels!
Whilst 'mayonnaise' is a commonly accepted term to use when describing the substance found in the filler cap, it is actually a mix of oil and water, personally I think it looks more like toffee flavoured yoghurt, but I wouldn't like to eat it


"It's a Rover, Of Course it’s Got Head Gasket Failure"

OK, let’s straighten a few things out from the start... not all Rover's have Head Gasket Failure (HGF). I have owned, driven and known an awful lot of people with Rovers and HGF is not quite as common (in my experience) as some people make out. However, HGF is an issue, whether the Rover Group of the time will admit to it or not, and it is mostly apparant in the late 90's cars (the bubble 200's and 400s).

Good maintenance, regular checks and good servicing will help reduce the risk of any such failures, or even help detect them early enough to keep repair costs down, but it is not a guarantee to prevent it from occurring. A number of changes have been made over the last 16 years to the 'K-Series' and it has been used successfully in a number of applications including the Lotus Elise and the Caterham 7.

Don't let people scare you off because of this 'issue' but do be mindful of it. From within the MG-Rover range of products, HGF is most common in the higher stressed engines, that means the 1.8's and VVC's, The Rover 218, 200 Vi & BRM are the most likely to get it, as are the MG F, TF, ZR120, ZR160, ZS120 and ZT160 with the 1.8Turbo.

The Rover 200Vi will be the 5th K-series powered product I have owned and the second that has had a Head Gasket Failure. To put that into perspective, the Vi has got 165,000 miles on the clock and is 9 years old. My other car to receive it was a 1994 Rover 214SEi, which had a known coolant leak during my budget stricken University days, for a good 9 months before it finally turned into HGF. At the time, that car was also 9 years old and had 125,000 miles on the clock. Not a bad set of mileage for 2 so-called problematic cars.

To those, unlike me, who are fluent in how the K-series works, I've probably got all sorts of naming conventions and technicalities wrong - to you all, I apologise and welcome any corrections and feedback you have to offer so that I can keep us all in the picture. In the mean time, please bear with me

What is a Head Gasket and Why has it Failed?

The head gasket itself is actually a very simple item... in simplistic terms (because that’s the only way I understand them!) it is a very thin piece of metal, that sits between the head and the main engine block, and stops the oil and water mixing together.

This thin sheet, comes with a rubbery plastic beading around the edges, which are a seal to help keep all the fluids where they should be. Just as you would seal the edges of your bath, to stop the water leaking through.


A failure, then, should seem fairly self explanatory, the seal has failed, the oil and water have mixed. A lack of oil and water in the right places of the engine causes it to overheat and potentially go BANG.Surprised

What causes the seal to break?

Well, to be honest I don’t really know. A loss of coolant seems to be a common cause. Checking the seal on the expansion tank cap, and replacing if necessary can help prevent such a loss. Checking all hoses and connections is another way. Once the engine has lost some coolant, is naturally finds it harder to keep itself cool, the pressure can build up with the temperatures and it can cause the seal to break... or at least, this is how I understand it.

The use of 'plastic' dowels to locate the head and engine block in the right place are also attributed to the failure, as these apparantly can warp under the extreme temperatures and cause the 2 layers to move, which in turn splits the gasket seal. The use of the plastic dowels was to meet critism of the steel ones used in earlier engines rusting and making it impossible to remove the head. The choice of plastic was supposedly a 'state-of-the-art' heat resistant one that would not warp... time has proven otherwise, it seems. After the year 2000 an 'update' kit was released by Rover to use new steel dowels on any cars that required a repair from the failue.

2006, The MLS (Multi Layer Steel) Gasket

Quote:
Originally Posted by http://www.cometic.com/catalogs/AutoCat04.pdf
The Cometic MLS gasket is comprised of three layers of stainless Steel. Cometic uses Stainless steel for increased strength, it’s ability to rebound and corrosion resistance. The outer layers of the gasket are embossed and coated on both sides with a flouroelastomer rubber based material (Viton) designed to meet the demands of a variety of harsh sealing environments, load conditions and surface finishes. The Viton coating is heat resistant to 2500C or 4820F. The center or shim layer of the gasket is comprised of anuncoated Stainless Steel layer, which can be varied to accommodate multiple thickness requirements. The MLS gasket is ideal for both aluminum heads to cast iron blocks and aluminum heads to aluminum blocks.

The composition of MLS will also withstand the shearing forces created by aluminum heads on cast iron blocks. No re-torque is necessary. By design the MLS gasket promotes an even torque load across the sealing surface allowing for easurable reduced bore distortion.


Did everyone get that? Good... Because it only makes vague sense to me, I am hoping someone can translate it into something useful

In short, this new design, backed by Land Rover for the use of the K-series engine in their Freelander model, is supposed to put an end to the problem once and for all, by creating a better seal.

Personally I cant argue with the design, as this does away with the rubber beading, which seems to be the failure point on my example and others which I have seen.


How I Did Mine

**IMPORTANT : Please Note**

The following information is not a 'how-to' guide or to be considered as a set of instructions for your own DIY job.

What is written here is not open for 'tutting', negative 'you shouldn't have done that' comments or any form of abuse what so ever.

This 'documentary' is simply to show others what problems I had, and my chosen solutions. I do not recommend taking on this job yourself unless you are experienced in working with engines, and certainly not to choose a 'VVC' as your first experiment.

Any actions you take as a result of what you have read here are entirely your own actions and at your own liability - If I told you to jump under a bus, I'm sure you wouldn't Wink (please don't do that, either!)

The parts I required :
  • Land Rover / Powertrain, Multi-Layered Steel (MLS) head gasket.
  • Cam Cover gasket
  • Coolant elbow gasket
  • Exhaust manifold gasket
  • Oil filter
  • Spark plugs
  • Air filter
  • Cambelt
  • Thermostat
  • Water Pump
  • Land Rover, uprated oil ladder / rail
The tools I required :
  • A rachet socket set with numerous adaptors
    • 8mm-22mm sockets
    • 14mm and 15mm 'long' sockets
    • Spark plug socket
    • 8mm hex-key adaptor
    • 3/4 to 1/2 adaptor
    • 1/2 to 3/4 adaptor
    • E-Drive socket set (for head bolts)
  • Standard set of swan-neck spanners
  • Torque wrenches for use between 8Nm and 160Nm
  • 1/2 size breaker bar
    • Extensions (x2)
  • 3/4 size breaker bar
    • Extension
  • Wire brush
  • Axel stands (x2)
  • Trolley jack
  • Battery charger
  • Oil filter removal tool
  • Cam locking tool
  • Spring balance
  • WD40 (for rusted bolts)
  • Coolant System Flush
  • Cheap Tesco's Oil (6L)
  • Cleaning Utensils
    • Methelated spirits
    • Pack of scouring pads
    • Kitchen tissue paper (6 rolls)
    • Good soap (for me!)
Work undertaken (in no particular order)

What you see here is still under construction, pictures alone do not tell the whole story. At all times, be mindful that bolts must be tightened and loosened in a specific order to prevent damage to gaskets and other vital parts. Bolts must also be tightened to a specific torque rating, failure to observe such details will cause irreparable or expensive damage.

If nothing else, a sheered bolt is a pain in the arse!

Removing the Cambelt

I have taken this section away from the main article here. The information shown may be of relevence to someone who is interested in changing a cambelt, without the fuss and hassle of the rest of the head gasket repair. ie) Home servicing.

ADDITION

There is more to follow, but here are some pics of the cambelt cogs and the belt, once the cover(s) have been removed. This is not intended as a how-to article, but to show how I did mine, please seek professional advice before changing a cambelt, or have a qualified mechanic do the work for you.

The cam belts are among the most important parts of the engine, incorrect fitting or lack of servicing these items can cause major engine failure.

I was fortunate that the previous cambelt change had meant that all the parts been nicely colour coded, to ensure alignment and correct identification. If removing any parts, I thoroughly recommend doing the same. I also recommend the use of a digital camera, which allowed me to go back in time and see how it looked before I took everything apart!

On with the show...

Firstly, I removed the cambelt covers. There were 5 or 6 bolts holding the upper-outer cover in place. The inner cover remained connected to the engine. I had to be careful when removing the cover, not to tear the plastic case at the lower points as this was close to snapping off, loosing protection and the ability to replace one of the bolts. I would say that whoever did the last change was not being so careful.


Cambelt Cover has Hidden Bolt, Located Near Dipstick


Camshaft Cogs Exposed with cover removed.


Rear timing belt, exclusive to the VVC

I then made sure the two cam's at the top are aligned by rotating the engine. I did this using the crank pulley, and not the cam pulleys, to avoid loosening the cams.


Camshaft Cogs Aligned Properly at 90 degrees

The fact that the above markings are aligned, meant that this was already in alignment. This was important to note as this had to remain in alignment when the new belt was fitted. I removed the alloy wheel from the front of the car to get access.


Aligned Crankshaft Cog With Alignment Markings Highlighted

Although it took me quite some time to locate one, this cam locking tool was invaluable, as it holds the cams in place, fully timed, while I do what needs to be done. It cost me about £5 from a motor factor, but I had to ring around to find one in stock.


Locking The Cams In Place With the Correct Locking Tool

The tensioner pulley was loosened next. There are two parts to undo, the tensioner plat bolt, which requires a swan-neck spanner, to loosen and tighten by hand, and the off-center bolt through the middle of the pulley, which I loosened using my allen (hex) key fitment for my socket wrench.

Now the tensioner was loose, I could remove the belt itself. I found a second pair of hands for this stage, one of us edged the belt off from the cam pulleys, while the other was in the drivers wheel well removing it from the crank pulley. The belt comes off easiest it seems, when being removed 'straight'.


Cambelt Removed and View of Engine Mount Bolts

Now the belt was loose, I needed to remove the engine mount to enable me to remove the belt entirely, as this passes through the centre of the belt. I could have cut it off, but the new belt has to go on somehow!

I supported the engine weight using a trolley jack and some old planks of wood. These were placed strategically under the oil sump, using the wood to spread the load and protect the sump. The jack was raised high enough to support the engine weight while the engine remained in place when mount was removed.

The mount itself was removed by taking out the 2 bolts and lifting the arm up. This allows for the old belt be brought out and the new one fitted back.

Fitting is as they say the opposite of removal, the 2 bolts are replaced, and most importantly, torqued to the correct settings... if only to prevent the engine from falling off the mounts when under load.

I obtained the torque settings from a Haynes manual.

I found fitting the new belt to be a little fiddly. Again, it took two of us to re-fit the belt from above and below. It needed to go on as straight as it came off, but with the additional complication of ensuring the pulleys all stayed in place while we did so.

Re-tighten the tensioner pulley, but not fully.

Fit cambelt tensioning kit (The bolt and spring). The official X-Part cambelt should provide instructions for using this and fitting it. Below is a diagram to show you how it all lays out.


Cambelt tensioning diagram

Loosen tensioner plate bolt.

Rotate crank at least 2 full turns.

Check all pulleys are still correctly aligned, most of the time, they will be out by a single notch.

Tighten tensioner bolt and tensioner backing bolt to specified torque.

Replace cambelt covers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CM5oA2X03z8

Removing and Refitting The Airbox Assembley

I have taken this section away from the main article here. The information shown may be of relevence to someone who is interested in removing their airbox assembley, without the fuss and hassle of the rest of the head gasket repair. ie) Fitting an induction kit.

Removing the K-Series Camshaft-Cover

In this first image, you can see I have already removed the bolts, HT Leads, spark splugs and the plastic cover.


A Useful Tool - A Cam Cover Bolt Organiser!


Rover K-Series Cam Cover Still Fitted


Rover K-Series Cam Cover Removed, Exposing the Gasket


Cam Cover Gasket Removed


Rover K-Series Cam Cover Removed


The Cam Cover After a Quick Wipe


Inside a K-Series, the Cams Exposed on a VVC

Removing the head


View of Rusted Bolts on Exhaust Manifold


The Exhaust Manifold Removed


Plenty of Rust!


The Coolant Elbow, Still Fitted to The Head


The Bolts That Hold The Coolant Elbow in Place


The Coolant Elbow Removed


Two More Coolant Pipes to Remove


The Fuel Input Hose is Located Below the Throttle Body



Two Bolts Hold the Fuel Hose in Place


Support Beam, Located at The Rear of The Head, Holds it in Place


Access to The Head Support Beam Bolt



The Head Bolt Organiser


The Head Bolt Organiser


Initial Removal of The Head


Be Careful of Extruding Valves!


Rover K-Series, Head Removed With Gasket Exposed


Rover K-Series, Head Removed With Gasket Removed


Wiring Loom Connectors For VVC Head


An Empty Looking Engine Bay!

The Cleaning Operation


The Underside of The Head, Pre Cleaning


The Underside of The Head, After a Quick Clean


The Underside of The Head, After a Better Clean
  • Removing the water pump
  • Removing and refitting the oil sump
Changing the oil ladder / rail


Original Oil Rail Fitted


Old Verses New, The Different Designs


New Oil Rail Fitted
  • Removing the exhaust manifold
  • Removing and changing the Thermostat
  • Changing the oil filter
  • Changing the spark plugs
AUTOR: GT

Last edited by Blueser; 03-08-2010 at 19:45.
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Old 23-09-2010, 16:59   #117
1955diesel
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While the head is off and stripped, it might be a good time to read this guide by Kitch, it is good stuff and well worth following -

Quick How To: Refurb noisy tappets on K-Series
Thought I'd copy this over on here as I've learnt that the tappets in my ZS are identical to those in my Citroen BX! I was taught this by the guys on the 205GTi drivers forum (who rape the BX 16v for it's Mi16 engine to use in their trackcars, but luckily aren't afraid to get stuck in and share their knowledge!)
This might help cure the noisy tappet syndrome alot of people seem to suffer with on here, and I've not seen this technique mentioned anywhere else on here after quick search. New items are priced at £60+ for a set apparently, so it's a nice little way to save money in between other jobs (H/G change no doubt!)

The tappets need to be removed to do this, so it's cams out and cambelt off if you wish to attempt it (thankfully you can remove the cams without disturbing the headbolts/head gasket). You also need to allow days for this, due to the need to soak certain parts in desgreasers etc. If you have a parts cleaner to hand, you could probably speed the whole process up.

Remove the rocker cover to expose cams (ignore missing exhaust etc....was in the middle of H/G change):



Remove the timing belt, and then remove the cam carrier ladder from the top of the head so the cams can be removed. This is all detailed in the Haynes manual


The tappets have been removed in this pic (I forgot to take one with them in!). Easiest way to remove them is a magnetic retreval tool.

Heres the underside of your grubby tappet. The outer part is the bucket, the inner part is the piston assembly.



I then pop them in cups of Gunk for 24hrs to aid the next step. It's best practice to keep all the tappets marked to the valve from which they came, although on my K-series they all got mixed up and have since gone back together completely fine so I wouldn't panic if you can't keep them together. Much more important is to keep the internal contents of the tappet with it's bucket....don't mix these up with other tappets.



The next step is to cup the tappet in your hand and whack it repeatedly against a plank of wood until the piston assy drops out. It's been recommended to wear tough gloves doing this, as it kills your hand after about 5 mins! You're left with this:



If you put the bucket to one side for a minute, the piston that's just dropped out comprises of three parts....the piston body, the spring and the relieft valve. They might resist coming apart due to the vacuum of the oil but they will come apart. If they're anything like mine in the ZS, they'll look like this:


The valve that oil passes through is under that thick crap, so little wonder it was tappy!

Place all three parts of the piston, plus the bucket in degreaser and allow to soak. Then use a suitable brush (the teet end of a babys bottle brush works well!) to scrub out the components:



Remember to ensure they're clean throughout and check the feed hole in the side of the bucket is clear, as they won't fill with oil once in the engine unless it is! Place back in degreaser for a while before washing with warm water, at which point they'll look something like this:


If you're not going to reassemble immediately, spray them with WD40 or GT85 etc to stop them rusting up, which they will....quickly!

Next step is to redress the top of the bucket. I'm not completely sure why this is recommended, I assume it quietens down valve gear noise when the cam presses down on the bucket. To do this, place the bucket upside down on a piece of 60 grit (yes, 60 grit!) sandpaper and proceed to do figure of 8 patterns.



Every few figures, rotate the bucket 90 degrees and perform again until you've eventually rotated it the full 360 degress. You'll end up with this:


Redressed on right, old glazed unit on left

Now to reassemble. Take the piston/relief valve and piston body, fill with water and squeeze together. They'll resist until you depress the relief valve like so:



....at which point water will spray out under pressure, depending on how hard you're squeezing it! This makes sure you've fully cleaned the valve out....if it it dribbles, time to degrease again.

If all is well (it usually is), next stage is to dry off and refill the piston body with fresh oil and do the same again. However, this time press lightly before pressing the valve. You aren't trying to expell the oil, only the air trapped around it. Once all the air is gone, it's done.
Then, fill the bucket with oil until it reaches the lip of the hole the piston sits in, and re-insert the piston assy back into the bucket:



You'll spray some oil out of the filler hole and probably end up with some preload (about 1mm is fine, its nearly impossible to get all the air out) but once they're all clicked back together, you're done:



Refit to head and reassemble cams/timing belt etc as instructed. When you restart the engine, the amount of noise from the tappets will depend on how well you got removed the air from the tapets, but it's not abnormal to need to leave them 2mins or so to shut up fully. One of mine took 10mins in the ZS (they do if you forget to fill the bucket with oil ) but it now runs sily smooth and silent.

Hopefully this'll help someone out just as it helped me out!

Cheers
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Old 30-12-2010, 00:44   #118
tshyb12
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Car: Rover 400 (95-99)
Posts: 24
?sequence

?Sequence
Hi,
Having been inspired by the guide and positives posts Iíve started slowly stripping off the engine of an old (96) Rover 416 si (twin cam 16 valve).My question is about sequence of deataching inlet and outlet manifolds. Can the manifolds go before taking off cambelt and camshaft cover? I donít see any obstacles to take them off first.
Thanks
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Old 30-12-2010, 09:42   #119
1955diesel
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Manifolds can come off at any convenient stage.
Some garages will even just leave them in place, but I would take this opportunity to clean the faces and fit new gaskets.
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Old 05-01-2011, 19:52   #120
Blueser
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Arrow

And this manual can be used.
http://forums.lr4x4.com/index.php?showtopic=22441


Last edited by Blueser; 05-01-2011 at 20:06.
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