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Old 04-02-2006, 19:36   #1
ashy
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XADO - Is this stuff credible?

http://www.xado-usa.com./

What do you lot think?
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Old 04-02-2006, 19:39   #2
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More of this teflon type snake oil by the looks of it.
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Old 04-02-2006, 19:53   #3
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It looks a bit more technological than that. Doesn't contain PTFE, but uses some sort of molecular bonding technology at high temperatures. Seems credible enough as heat can be catalyst for a reaction to take place. I mean oil can be made this way, so why not something else?
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:02   #4
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It could well coat the parts, but then what does the oil grip?
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:08   #5
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Quote:
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It could well coat the parts, but then what does the oil grip?
You've lost me there Stu. What do you mean 'what does the oil grip?'
Why does oil need to grip?
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:11   #6
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Otherwise it will all end up in the sump when you switch off the engine.

Granted most does, but due to the fact that the surfaces have miniscule pits in them some clings to the components meaning less friction when starting.

Make the surfaces smoother and the oil will not grip and you will end up with surfaces touching that wouldn't normally.
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:16   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu
Otherwise it will all end up in the sump when you switch off the engine.

Granted most does, but due to the fact that the surfaces have miniscule pits in them some clings to the components meaning less friction when starting.

Make the surfaces smoother and the oil will not grip and you will end up with surfaces touching that wouldn't normally.
I see what you mean Stu, but it wouldn't matter. If 2 surfaces in contact with each other were perfectly flat at a molecular level then you wouldn't even need oil.

Oil is simply a barrier between 2 surfaces that creates this perfectly smooth surface by filling in the microscopic mollecular cracks and crevices in a surface.
It is these 'pits' that you refer to that cause the friction and hence wear.

Without these pits there will be no friction, so the parts that the oil doesn't cling to will be smooth enough not to produce friction anyway and the parts that aren't will still be protected with oil.
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:18   #8
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Yes, but does this stuff do as good a job of sealing the surfaces as oil? If it does then they would be saying you don't need oil anymore.

And what chemical effect does it have on the engine oil as well.
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:26   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu
Yes, but does this stuff do as good a job of sealing the surfaces as oil? If it does then they would be saying you don't need oil anymore.

And what chemical effect does it have on the engine oil as well.
Agreed, oil does more than just lubricate. It seals and cools.

You could never have a 100% smooth surface. I don't think it's possible, so oil will always have it's place in an engine. But if this stuff does what it says, it only bonds to surfaces of high friction and thus create heat for the reaction to take place.

Makes sense to me. If there are spots in the engine that are subject to high friction then this will produce heat that will cause a molecular reaction and the bonding process to begin.

Not enough friction means not enough heat and the oil is doing it's job there which means no reaction, so really only the parts that need it are being treated.
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:28   #10
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Isn't that why you use the correct viscosity oil?

As in use 10w40, not 5w40.
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Old 04-02-2006, 20:37   #11
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this I liked it in a kind of double negitive way they seem to want to detach themselves from 'oil additives' Enjoy-

XADO is NOT an oil additive!! XADO does NOT change the characteristics or viscosity of the oil in any way. However, we do use the oil to INITIALLY deliver XADO to the moving parts of your engine.

ha ha ha... what so it is not an oil additive yet it is administered in that way!! ooh the stigma of oil additve must have got to them he he ROLF

then the seeminly plausible way in which it works ummmm so It can tell the differance between totally differant alloys yet with seeming accuracy deliver it to the correct working part.

Well if I myself was about to invent a snake oil I could not think of a better untangable product than of this.

Only my own opinion you dont have to listen at all I may be talking poop?
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Old 05-02-2006, 08:58   #12
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It's a waste of time, avoid using it.
Oil is the only thing that should be used.
It's the film strength that's important.
A good quality semi synth is just fine, just change it every 6k miles if you are worried.
Personally I change it every 12k miles for each service.
Never had an issue with premature engine wear.
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Old 05-02-2006, 09:10   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amagoza
It's a waste of time, avoid using it.
Oil is the only thing that should be used.
It's the film strength that's important.
A good quality semi synth is just fine, just change it every 6k miles if you are worried.
Personally I change it every 12k miles for each service.
Never had an issue with premature engine wear.
Thats the thing Im gona stick me head out but I reckon 88.7% of cats that preffered wiskers never had any premature engine wear too.

Yet they scare the poor guy into thinking so
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Old 27-09-2007, 17:55   #14
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Xado’s formulation ... minerals shangite, serpentine and muscovite,

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashy View Post
http://www.xado-usa.com./

What do you lot think?
http://www.xado-usa.com/
XADO is “a brand new product that’s 30 years old”. It was discovered accidentally north of Siberia in the early 70’s when workers discovered that when they drilled in a certain area, their drill bits were not wearing out. The ground was analyzed and an ore was discovered that, when introduced to high temperatures, created a ceramic-like layer on metal tools. In the early 90’s, this ore was synthesized and marketed in Europe for use in engines, tools and machinery. Use of XADO quickly spread to over 120 countries. In 2003, a U.S. patent was issued for the XADO product and process.

http://xado-usa.com/testimonials.html
........ A synthetic derivative of the minerals shangite, serpentine and muscovite, Xado’s formulation ......

The Russian project was taken over by engineers in Italy, who found the ideal material for the additive to be the mineral serpentine, which is rich in hydrated magnesium silicate.
http://www.xaracon.com/asbestos/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscovite
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpentine
http://www.galleries.com/minerals/si...t/muscovit.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special...ulltext=Search
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Old 27-09-2007, 18:15   #15
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The oil does indeed require surface texture in order to cling to the surfaces and lubricate them. Perfectly smooth surfaces tend to stick together when there is no oil, you can demonstrate this by twisting slip gauges together - they stick very well! This is why a burnished bearing surface will scuff up.

Metal particles in the oil? Most will be taken out by the filter, does it matter what kind of metal is left behind for this stuff to work or is it just "metal"?

We once performed a series of tests on engines using microfine diamond dust! This polished the working surfaces to a mirror finish, but produced no measureable extra power or any other improvement. However, it did wear the engine out after about 100 hours running ;-)
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Old 29-09-2007, 11:57   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashy View Post
What do you lot think?

Save your money and get an ebay power chip instead!

If you're feeling flush maybe go for a variable power version.

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Old 01-11-2007, 11:40   #17
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XADO Don’t knock it – It worked for me!

In defence of the stuff - it some how works. Well for me it did! My choice was a new engine or goodbye to beloved MGB.

Always been against additives. In my case I had nothing to loose and it seemed different. If it worked I couldn’t care what it is made of.

Can only say I am back touring - no expensive recon - happy as Larry

MBG calm sweet and purring. Added benefit she is also drinking less fuel.

Ordered from the UK site and happy to sing their praises – http://www.xado.co.uk/engine_treatme..._additives.htm
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Old 01-11-2007, 16:39   #18
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' It was discovered accidentally north of Siberia in the early 70’s when workers discovered that when they drilled in a certain area, their drill bits were not wearing out. '


maybe I should try adding drilling mud next oil change?

The science is plausable, but im not convinced.
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Old 09-11-2007, 09:04   #19
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XADO - Worked for me!

Rocker,

Let us know how you get on with drilling mud!! If it works - let me know and we can team up aka Dell boy & Rodney - remember peckham water!!!

In all fairness I was not convinced - but it did seem to work. Have subsequently used some of their oil (rather than drilling mud). All seems kosha to me as I suppose the would not be allowed tio sell if it wasn't.
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Old 27-11-2007, 19:54   #20
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Useful Xado video

Hi Guys,

I came accross this video which gives a good overview of Xado technology.
It can be found here http://xado.co.nz/faq.php .

Hope you find it useful!

Cheers
Costa
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