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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, new to this forum so I'd like to say hello then apologise because Im sure my question has been asked more than once before.......

How difficult is it for a hobby mechanic to change the head gasket on a 1.8 75? I have a basic mechanical knowledge but it is all built around vw Beetles/vans and the addition of water makes me a touch nervous!!!!

Also while/if I am going ahead, what else should I replace while it is broken down? I plan to use the mls gasket and change the timing belt as it is now overdue. I belive the problem originated from a split pipe below/behind the battery that goes through the body I assume to the heater. No real signs of a problem before hand just overheated one day and after I limped it home I noticed oil on the rad cap, inside the oil filler cap and a little around the dipstick.

Any help will be much apprciated, many thanks, Karl
 

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It's not that difficult, lots of owners have done it. There are some precautions to take regarding the liners, but if you get a Haynes manual it will be plain sailing. It's usually recommended that the cam belt, tensioner and water pump are renewed during the job.

You'd be wise to consider fitting the latest gasket, oil rail and head bolts kit from Xpart. Details here: http://www.prlog.org/10434266-xpart-supplies-ultimate-fix-for-mg-rover-kseries-engine.html

TC
 

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rover_75
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Not difficult i am now able to change the head gasket in 3hrs from start to finish (lots of practice though)

in your situation i would agree with T-Cut in fitting the latest kit available if you are keeping the car

Also as you car overheated and you limped it home you must get the head checked for warpage and skimmed if neccesary
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi guys thanks for the replies, before I get my hands dirty..

Are there any spcialist tools I would need, ( for locking the cams for instance ) would rather buy anything within reason just to make sure I get the job right!.....

If I need the head skimmed and I expect to, this is my luck! surely the head bolts are going to be a bit long? If so is it ok to take a bit off the end on the grinding wheel or do I need to get some new shorter ones?

Thanks, Karl
 

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rover_75
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standard bolts will be fine (the thread in the oil rail they go into is open (ie the bolts go right through them)

i have not needed to use the locking tool but it maybe easier for you to use it (usually available on e-bay at arround £5)

The only other "special tools" you will need is a female E12 socket for the head bolts(looks like a normal socket but unstead if a hex shape in it it is a spline type shape)and you will need a torque wrench


Make sure you undo the crank pulley nut FIRST BEFORE you start dismantling the head (usually very tight and will usually turn the engine a little whilst you are trying to undo the crank pulley bolt obviously not a problem with the timeing belt still on as it will remain in alignment)

The only other important thing is NEVER TURN THE ENGINE OVER TO MOVE THE PISTONS WHILST THE HEAD IS OFF if you do you may well break the seal at the bottom of the liners.
 

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How difficult is it for a hobby mechanic
Make sure you undo the crank pulley nut FIRST BEFORE you start dismantling the head (usually very tight and will usually turn the engine a little whilst you are trying to undo

much easier with a impact wrench, as a hobby mechanic, wise purchase.

my cordless 24v rated at 380Nm makes short work of the 205Nm crank bolt.
 

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cityrover
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Hi, It is also very important that the Engine/Head Bolts are tightend in the correct seqence to 64Nm (maybe wise to use new Engine Bolts, as the old ones maybe beyond their stretch tolerance spec) so you will need an accurate Torque Rench. The Bolts in question are a basic part of the engines design concept and perform a very special function. The Torque setting is important and the Bolts must be tightend in the sequence stipulated, and also do not be tempted to exceed to torque setting figures given.
Goes without saying that both the Block and Cylinder Head faces are absolutely true, before any fitting takes place.
Fit the full Modified Cylinder Head Gasket Kit Part No. ZUA000080 available from Xpart agents or direct from Xpart. Note Xpart Warranty cancelled if the Modified Oil Feed Ladder Rail is not fitted.
This Kit consist of 3 Items 1:- MLS Head Gasket. 2:- Cylinder Head Shim, fitted with the Black Face uppermost to the Cylinder Head. 3:- Modified Oil Feed Ladder Rail. This last item will require you to remove the Engines Oil Sump to gain access to it. The Modified Oil Ladder Rail is a very important part of the modification and therefore an essential item to ensure a long term and successful repair.
Not too sure how old your engine is, but on reassembling the head to the engine be sure to fit new Steel Location Dowels to the Head and Block. These are sometimes supplied with the Head Gasket, but make sure you have them. Earlier engines used plastic type Dowels, which allowed the Cylinder Head to shuffle under certain conditions, which could lead to Gasket failure and sometimes Cylinder Liner damage. This is the reason for them being replaced by the Steel type. One final and very important check is to measure the Cylinder Liner Height in relation to their height to the face of the Cylinder Block, they should be in the region of 2thou to no more than 5thou above the Block Face and all the Liners should be at an even height to each other. Flush or below the level of the block face is not good but there maybe a chance of getting away with it if they are flush, but would not recommend it.
It is also essential that you find the reason for the failure, but you seem to be satisfied it was due to split pipe. Many repairs have failed due to not finding the root cause. There is always a cause, gaskets do not just fail on their own.
Also please check the Engine Bolt Torque setting with your supplier in case they have been revised due to any material changes etc affecting the figures quoted.
Hope this is of assistance.
Regards,
Telfer.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the replies. I am almost sure that the split pipe was the cause but this brings me back to my other question of what else to replace while I have it broken down. I am thinkin of doing the water pump and thermostat as well as the timing belt and also the cam cover gasket as there was a small amount of oil in one of the spark plug recess's. I will use the x part kit as recomended on here so the oil rail will be changed and the dowels that keep coming up on searches and explained in more detail below by telferstr and of course the pipe that I belive was the start of my problem.......what else? would like to change anything reasonable while it is broken down.
Thanks Karl
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks got thsat from the manual, what id like to know is there anything else thats worth doing while its in bits..... Dont want to have to break it all open again in sixth months to do something silly that could have been done now.

Thanks Karl
 

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to be honest, if time wasn't an issue I would check the valves for seating, clean the tappets and change the valve stem seals.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi, yeah thats exactly it, got a few days spare to work on it not the end of the world if its not finished in that time ( not expecting it to be to be honest as Im pretty sure im gonna need a skim ) so Id like to do as much as possible within the scope of a part time diy mechanic. In the past Ive had problems with the top end in numerous cars and vans and realy like my 75 so want to keep it going as far as I can......

Cheers Karl
 

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Timing belt and pump fitted not so long ago .Is it possible to do head gasket just remove belt from sprockets . Make shure.marks ok remove sprockets then remove head ?
Inlet manifold removal ?I'm ok with that (mgf)
 

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Any one knows what’s wrong with the rover 75 1.8 petrol
Lately changing gears has become hard any every time I press on clutch it sound like a grinding noise why could it be any help thanks


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Hi, It is also very important that the Engine/Head Bolts are tightend in the correct seqence to 64Nm (maybe wise to use new Engine Bolts, as the old ones maybe beyond their stretch tolerance spec) so you will need an accurate Torque Rench. The Bolts in question are a basic part of the engines design concept and perform a very special function. The Torque setting is important and the Bolts must be tightend in the sequence stipulated, and also do not be tempted to exceed to torque setting figures given.
Goes without saying that both the Block and Cylinder Head faces are absolutely true, before any fitting takes place.
Fit the full Modified Cylinder Head Gasket Kit Part No. ZUA000080 available from Xpart agents or direct from Xpart. Note Xpart Warranty cancelled if the Modified Oil Feed Ladder Rail is not fitted.
This Kit consist of 3 Items 1:- MLS Head Gasket. 2:- Cylinder Head Shim, fitted with the Black Face uppermost to the Cylinder Head. 3:- Modified Oil Feed Ladder Rail. This last item will require you to remove the Engines Oil Sump to gain access to it. The Modified Oil Ladder Rail is a very important part of the modification and therefore an essential item to ensure a long term and successful repair.
Not too sure how old your engine is, but on reassembling the head to the engine be sure to fit new Steel Location Dowels to the Head and Block. These are sometimes supplied with the Head Gasket, but make sure you have them. Earlier engines used plastic type Dowels, which allowed the Cylinder Head to shuffle under certain conditions, which could lead to Gasket failure and sometimes Cylinder Liner damage. This is the reason for them being replaced by the Steel type. One final and very important check is to measure the Cylinder Liner Height in relation to their height to the face of the Cylinder Block, they should be in the region of 2thou to no more than 5thou above the Block Face and all the Liners should be at an even height to each other. Flush or below the level of the block face is not good but there maybe a chance of getting away with it if they are flush, but would not recommend it.
It is also essential that you find the reason for the failure, but you seem to be satisfied it was due to split pipe. Many repairs have failed due to not finding the root cause. There is always a cause, gaskets do not just fail on their own.
Also please check the Engine Bolt Torque setting with your supplier in case they have been revised due to any material changes etc affecting the figures quoted.
Hope this is of assistance.
Regards,
Telfer.
Much better advice about torquing head .I would much rather use wrench than the recommended 180 degrees once then 180 degrees second time after starting with
20 nm
 

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Is 64 Mm official ?head torque
No. I have no idea where that poster got a figure of 64Nm from, but it is total cobblers.

You must use the initial 20Nm to settle the gasket followed by the correct angle tightening sequence.

For the original type SLS/elastomer gasket or the first type MLS, this is 180 degrees + 180 degrees (or 4 stages of 90 degrees if you prefer).

For the SAIC 6-layer MLS, used with the higher tensile long bolts as supplied in the XPart kit, it is 180 degrees + 135 degrees.

You need to use the angle tightening because this takes all the bolts to a known tightness - the bolts need to be tightened to slightly short of the yield point (the point at which the bolt goes from elastic stretch to permanent or plastic stretch and beyond this point, further tightening will not increase the clamping force), so that when the engine castings expand due to heat at operating temperature it stretches the bolts to just beyond the yield point - this ensures that all bolts are at their maximum designed tension, and therefore the clamping force is even across the whole gasket area.

Using a conventional torque wrench won't achieve this degree of certainty.

(This is an 11 year old thread !!!)
 

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You need to use the angle tightening because this takes all the bolts to a known tightness - the bolts need to be tightened to slightly short of the yield point (the point at which the bolt goes from elastic stretch to permanent or plastic stretch and beyond this point, further tightening will not increase the clamping force), so that when the engine castings expand due to heat at operating temperature it stretches the bolts to just beyond the yield point - this ensures that all bolts are at their maximum designed tension, and therefore the clamping force is even across the whole gasket area.

Using a conventional torque wrench won't achieve this degree of certainty.

(This is an 11 year old thread !!!)
Tbh I’ve never got the logic of this angle tightening, I just do it because it’s the procedure. If you want even tightness, why not use a torque wrench? Add stages if you need to build it up slowly.

Tighten up to the yield point? Sounds nuts to me, usually you want to keep well below it if you don’t want to risk permanently deforming the metal. If that’s the pressure you need, specify stronger steel for the bolts.

I‘m not saying MITC is wrong, I’ve heard it all before, I just don’t get it! :unsure:
 
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