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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First of all, why should we fit them?

An engine causes a lot of vibration when it is running. To combat this the engine is mounted on rubber mounts to insulate the engine from the chassis and cuts down the noise and vibration.

Unfortunately, this allows the engine to move in relation to the chassis.

When you go to move away from a standing start the torque fed from the engine meets a resistance as the wheels aren't moving. This causes the engine to turn on it's axis. Depending whether you are in forward or reverse, this can be seen as the top of the engine moving forwards or backwards while the car is stationary.

If this movement is too excessive it can cause mechanical problems as it stresses hoses/exhausts etc.

It also has an effect on the handling of the car as the engine will move within the car under heavy acceleration or under engine braking. The fast and furious clan have known that this can rob you of a bit of torque when you accelerate away from the lights, so they fit engine stay bars from the engine to the chassis to limit the movement of the engine.

Good news, the f/tf already has one fitted.

Bad news, they are fitted with soggy rubber.

I have had several problems with my car which may be put down to excess engine movement. The car tended to kangaroo a bit when moving in slow stop/start traffic and it has eaten 3 exhaust hangers in the last 2 years. Still to see whether this cures the hanger proble. Only time will tell.

So, where is this engine stay?

It is located underneath your engine and ties the sump to the rear of the subframe. The job of the lower engine stay is to limit the twisting of the engine, but allow some articulation.



I bought the Torque Tamer kit from here http://www.moto-build.com/

And this is what came.



To get at the area you need to jack your car up and put it on axle stands, or put it on ramps, but remember to take all reasonable care to secure the car when you are working under it. Do not just leave it on the jack.

I reversed mine onto some ramps and chocked the front wheels.

Once you are under there you will need a 15mm socket or spanner and some release oil probably as the bolts will be rusty.

I also removed the flexi section of the exhaust for better access.

First undo and remove the bolt that holds the two halves of the bar together.



and swing the rear half down to clear the front half. Now loosen and remove the bolt holding the bush to the subframe mount.



Once the rear half is removed, remove the 4 bolts holding the sump half in place.



Now you can simply take the two halves to a local garage etc and ask them to press the old rubber bushes out.

The larger bush has a metal outer that needs pressing out too.



I thought I would have a go myself.

So I first drilled the rubber mount and started hacksawing the rubber.



After breaking the hacksaw I reconsidered.

A wreckless person who didn't care for the environment or next doors washing would have taken the easy route and burned the rubber out.

So, after I "removed" the rubber.



I used a small chisel to turn over the bushes metal outer over



Which allowed me to use a large socket and the vice to push it out.



I then took the opportunity to wire brush it and spray with hammerite. This is optional :)



The two polybush halves can then be lubed with the supplied lubricant



and pushed into place.



The centre tube can then be lubed and pushed into place.



and that is one half done.



The second half



I managed to push the rubber mount out using the vice and suitable sockets.



and wire brushed and painted



The new poly bush



was suitably lubed up and pressed into place.



and then the centre tube was lubed and pushed into place.



and that is both halves done.



and as they say, fitting is the reverse of removing.







Once tightened and the exhaust is put back together, take for a test drive and see what you think.

I have only been for one blast and I can definitely feel the difference, for the better.

Even fast gear changes feel more responsive.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I forgot to mention that there is a slight increase in vibration through the body, but it is hardly noticeable and only really at tickover.
 

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That's good stuff.
I have some nylon bar here that I am going to turn up to do this once i've finished my door card retrim (if the fellow with the mk1 door cards who I replied to last week is reading I've figured it out and it looks fine . Pics when I do the driver's side if you still want them)

As for the other mounts if you, or anyone else has a old/spare ones i'd be happy to run them through a coordinate measuring machine or my scanner to get CAD data with a view to making nylon or polyuretheane ones (i'd make my own and share out the cad drawings for those that wanted to make theirs.)
I've previously made metalastic bushes for other things and they tended to work well.
 

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Brilliant, but I wish you would stop, everytime I think I have finished modding you come up with something else that is a must!
 

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Great How to as usual, Clive.

Turning the car upside down to get pictures is, I feel, a little excessive though!

But £50 for a couple of bits of plastic, sheesh!
 

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Very interesting! I already plan to replace all the suspension bushes with polybushes, so I'll do this at the same time.

Also can't pass up an opportunity to paint and rust proof another thing underneath my car. :lol:

EDIT: Just bought a set of these and hopefully will be fitting them on Wednesday, as long as they're not tardy with delivery.
 

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Very interesting! I already plan to replace all the suspension bushes with polybushes
Before you do this.....do a little research....I'm sure I've been told on good authority....that completely poly bushing the suspension isn't the best route....but to replace with OEM, apparently all poly causes stress and damage...cant speak from personal experience....but wouldn't hurt to investigate further

Oh, as ever, great work Clive.....:broon:
 

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Very interesting! I already plan to replace all the suspension bushes with polybushes, so I'll do this at the same time.

Also can't pass up an opportunity to paint and rust proof another thing underneath my car. :lol:

EDIT: Just bought a set of these and hopefully will be fitting them on Wednesday, as long as they're not tardy with delivery.
Make sure you have a breaker bar or impact wrench to habd before you start, I had a real job getting the nuts off.

Also when taking out the shell of the old large bush, i hacksawed through it (carefully)then curled over the corner with a hammer and chisel. Might be easier than hammering and pressing out with a socket.
 

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Another great "how to" but weren't you taking the "Fitting is the reverse of removal" a bit far whe you turned the car upside down to refit - as per the photos?

and as they say, fitting is the reverse of removing.



 
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