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Discussion Starter #1
The battery gradually deteriorated, then failed, after I bought the car about 1½ years ago – to my delight, I found a receipt for it with the car’s paperwork, and it was less than a year old, so Euro Car Parts replaced it under warranty.

Now, less than another year later, it’s failed again. I reckon there are two possibilities here – either the car’s overcharging (at around 14V though, it doesn't seem to be) or Lion batteries are shi*te.

Can anybody enlighten me?
Ta :D
 

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No experience with Lion batteries, but what I do know is that car batteries last as much as warranty claim is and possibliy month longer and that is all.
Seems to me that you will get another replacement battery. Maybe that is not bad, each year you will get new battery ...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys - will take it back again tomorrow! I do wonder, though, if this could have contributed to my long saga of the alarm going off in the middle of the night. It was fine for about 6 months, and I think maybe that was immediately after I replaced the battery last time...

T4 said "Unknown reason" when asked what had triggered the alarm... hhmmm... hhhmmmmm....
 

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The battery gradually deteriorated, then failed, after I bought the car about 1½ years ago – to my delight, I found a receipt for it with the car’s paperwork, and it was less than a year old, so Euro Car Parts replaced it under warranty.

Now, less than another year later, it’s failed again. I reckon there are two possibilities here – either the car’s overcharging (at around 14V though, it doesn't seem to be) or Lion batteries are shi*te.

Can anybody enlighten me?
Ta :D
My varta blue eventually gave up. So I bought a lion battery. I have had 2. They don't last very long. They can be reconditioned though. I have kept the last one topped up as an emergency. The varta I have has not let me down.
 

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mg_tf
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I’ve not had a problem with Lion batteries, but I know someone who has, and this was sufficient to deter me from buying one.
I go with only buying premium brands such as Bosch and Varta ( same batteries I believe) and shopping around to get best prices on these. Personally, I would not buy a battery with less than a four year warranty.
 

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The one i had, strangely enough from Eurocarparts managed about 3 months of a Canadian winter. It was fitted to the car in July just before the car was exported. By January it was pretty much dead. The one -21°C night we had pretty much finished it off.

Got a Motormaster Eliminator battery on it now which has over double the cold crank amp output that the old one had and came with a 5 year warranty. Price wise it probably cost me about another £30 over the Lion one.
 

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mgf
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I replaced the battery in the F in July and had to replace it a week ago. I did notice that even though the clamp's nut on the positive terminal was fully tightened, the clamp was still just a little loose. I wonder if that contributed to the short battery life?
 

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I’ve not had a problem with Lion batteries, but I know someone who has, and this was sufficient to deter me from buying one.
I go with only buying premium brands such as Bosch and Varta ( same batteries I believe) and shopping around to get best prices on these. Personally, I would not buy a battery with less than a four year warranty.
I don't know anything about Li-Ion batteries.
However I'd bought an AGM Banner one (Austrian brand) with only 2 years warranty & it gave up recently after a 3 years & 5 months 1/2. I was surprised & a bit disappointed that a pricey AGM battery would not be able to last longer but after all it wasn't that bad.
Hence I've just bought a good value for money VARTA Silver Dynamic C6 Battery 12 V 52Ah 520 Amps for 65€ (£56). And 5 years warranty! Let's see how it'll go...
 

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Have a look at varta batteries. Also don't think that having a higher CCA is better! My standard battery was a 075 type with 45Ah. The Varta range goes from black, blue and silver. The silver has 600CCA - cold cranking amps. Great for cold weather. However look after your alternator. It will be working more to keep it charged. The Varta blue at 540cca is an ideal battery, somewhere in the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Red face time... so I stuck a voltmeter across it just to see, and all good... and my charger said it was OK.

I... ummm... this is so embarrassing... sanded and greased the posts and clamps, and roared off into the sunset. Well, Irish monsoon.

I haven't had to do that on a car since the 70's.
 

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mg_tf
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Apologies, but I’m not in complete agreement with the logic. Varta recommendation - most definitely yes. Strain on alternators? As I see it, the ‘capacity’ of the battery is measured in Ah, and if for you example that figure is 45Ah, then the battery is capable of running a consumption of 1amp for 45 hrs, or any combination of that division. Perhaps the Ah figure can be looked at as the capacity of say a kettle. The larger the kettle the more (Ah) capacity it will have.
The cold cranking current is the battery’s ability to put out a large demand current without damage - i.e. on initial cranking of the starter motor. The higher the figure, the more capable the battery will be to accommodate these high currents on regular demands. Back to the kettle - a bit like having a large spout to allow the water to flow out quickly. What I can’t really agree with is the adverse effect on the alternator. After all, considering the starter motor, it will only demand the designed current it needs.
 

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Apologies, but I’m not in complete agreement with the logic. Varta recommendation - most definitely yes. Strain on alternators? As I see it, the ‘capacity’ of the battery is measured in Ah, and if for you example that figure is 45Ah, then the battery is capable of running a consumption of 1amp for 45 hrs, or any combination of that division. Perhaps the Ah figure can be looked at as the capacity of say a kettle. The larger the kettle the more (Ah) capacity it will have.
The cold cranking current is the battery’s ability to put out a large demand current without damage - i.e. on initial cranking of the starter motor. The higher the figure, the more capable the battery will be to accommodate these high currents on regular demands. Back to the kettle - a bit like having a large spout to allow the water to flow out quickly. What I can’t really agree with is the adverse effect on the alternator. After all, considering the starter motor, it will only demand the designed current it needs.
Don't disagree. My last alternator worked harder in winter and eventually gave up the ghost.
 
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