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Hello guys,

I own a Rover Streetwise 2004 which ran 80.000km and has never had the cambelt changed. So I started the project to change cambelt and waterpump myself.

After removing all the necessary parts (RH engine mount and top cambelt cover). I turned the camshaft to its timing position (exhaust-in-exhaust-in) by turning the crankshaft clockwise.
Then I fitted camshaft locking tool (18G 1750). (SEE PICTURE)
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I didn't have the flywheel locking tool (18G 1751) but I saw several video's of people putting the car in highest gear with handbrake on and 1 person standing on the brake pedal.

Then I tried to remove the crankshaft pulley bolt but it was on super tight. Upon loosening it I saw the crankshaft pulley move counterclockwise.
Anf after removing the crank pulley I saw that crankshaft gear was not in timing position. ( SEE PICTURE)

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Can I fix this by removing cambelt then refitting crankshaft bolt and turning engine clockwise in timing position (keeping camshaft locked as is now) and then refitting cambelt and turning engine over several times to see if everything is in timing???

Please if someone knows help me :)
 

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MG TF
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If I am reading this correctly it sounds like you left the cam locking tool in place whilst removing the crankshaft bolt meaning that the crankshaft has moved in relation to the camshaft? If this is the case I think your best course of action is keep the camshafts locked and removed the belt and then correct the camshaft timing by replacing the bolt. I have recently changed the belt on my TF without the flywheel locking tool and forgot to remove the camshaft tool so that the timing was out by a small amount.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If I am reading this correctly it sounds like you left the cam locking tool in place whilst removing the crankshaft bolt meaning that the crankshaft has moved in relation to the camshaft? If this is the case I think your best course of action is keep the camshafts locked and removed the belt and then correct the camshaft timing by replacing the bolt. I have recently changed the belt on my TF without the flywheel locking tool and forgot to remove the camshaft tool so that the timing was out by a small amount.
Yes that is correct however upon putting the crankshaft in correct timing position I will pass TDC so I don't know if that will damage the valves :S.
 

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Do we assume that the plugs were out and you ensured you had TDC. The crank locking pin is very important part odd the procedure. As far as I am concerned even with the camlock in place you will find movement. if you turn the crank shaft nut. Try using a drill bit closest the crank pin hole size to lock the flywheel, this will help. Download the service manual for rover 25. They can be found on a few sites or you can borrow mine as attached.
 

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Do we assume that the plugs were out and you ensured you had TDC. The crank locking pin is very important part odd the procedure. As far as I am concerned even with the camlock in place you will find movement. if you turn the crank shaft nut. Try using a drill bit closest the crank pin hole size to lock the flywheel, this will help. Download the service manual for rover 25. They can be found on a few sites or you can borrow mine as attached.
This is already too late😅. I am now asking for advice whether to just return crankshaft in timing position or if this could damage the valves.
I understand that crank locking is important step however as I mentioned in my first post I tried it by putting car in gear but crank still moved counterclockwise.
 

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As the belt has slipped it does show that it was in a poor state.

I am inclined to think that if there is any damage it has already been done so I would remove the belt and move the crankshaft clockwise to the timing marks, as you are doing this by hand you will feel any resistance if the piston hits a valve and you can stop before you do any damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As the belt has slipped it does show that it was in a poor state.

I am inclined to think that if there is any damage it has already been done so I would remove the belt and move the crankshaft clockwise to the timing marks, as you are doing this by hand you will feel any resistance if the piston hits a valve and you can stop before you do any damage.
Will do that tomorrow, thank you :)
 
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