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Looking good and a great effort to save a car

Might I ask what paint you are using on the parts, or is it not too important because the car will not see many miles / winter etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Looking good and a great effort to save a car

Might I ask what paint you are using on the parts, or is it not too important because the car will not see many miles / winter etc.
So far I used mostly Hammerite to protect the refurbished parts that will be more exposed to the elements.

Anything that is more cosmetic has primer, colour, then clear lacquer applied.
 

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This looks like one of the jobs Fuzz and Tim attempt on Car SOS, they have a team and you’ve done this solo, well done!
 

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Discussion Starter #24
A very quick job tonight. This one has been niggling at me for a couple of weeks - namely the two track rod ends...

Even though the rubber boots and the tapers look fine and they feel nice and tight when you move them in your hand, I just couldn't get comfortable with not replacing them.

As the replacements were only a tenner for both, I decided to get it done. So both ball joints and now the TRE's have been changed on the front suspension.

Still waiting for the brake discs to be skimmed/cleaned up so that I can fit those and the new wheel bearings that I have waiting for each side. As soon as that is done the wheels can go back on and we can move forward again.

Have a nice evening everyone.
 

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For such little cost and effort it's worth changing the TREs if only for the assurance that they're new. If the ones that came off are still half decent then you have spares.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Cut off the entire exhaust system this morning which had all but rotted away.

As anticipated, despite repeated soakings during the week with penetrating fluid, 5 of the 6 downpipe to manifold bolts sheared off. The sixth one was missing already...

So that now leaves me with at least 5 bolts to remove - any ideas - drilling?, welding nuts to the remains and trying again:



On the plus side, I now have some useful access to other parts to clean, paint and generally inspect.

Cheers all, have a good weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I managed to get two of the rusted/seized bolts out this morning.

Billy blowtorch helped me heat up four studs and then armed with my trusty stillsons two unwound without too much trouble, one just chewed up more and refused to budge and the last one turned a bit, then sheared off again level with the manifold face.

Oh well, it looks like either welding nuts on or drilling out is the next stage.

Wish me luck!
 

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It might sound a bit silly, but when I've had an awkward stud (I work on motorcycles a lot). I used a blowtorch to heat up the metal around the stud and not the stud itself.

Mind you. The metal heated was always alloy, while the stud was steel (Aluminium expands more than steel).
 

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Discussion Starter #29
It might sound a bit silly, but when I've had an awkward stud (I work on motorcycles a lot). I used a blowtorch to heat up the metal around the stud and not the stud itself.

Mind you. The metal heated was always alloy, while the stud was steel (Aluminium expands more than steel).
Thanks for the tip Spudgun - and that is not silly at all, its a very sensible suggestion and one that I would have used.

Unfortunately though, due to the age of the car my manifold is cast iron. I did actually try to get a lot of heat into both the stud and the manifold and had some success (see above).

Oh well, onwards and upwards!

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
OK some tiny amounts of progress on the exhaust manifold a short time ago.

I remembered that I had bought some of those 'drill anything' drills at the Practical Classics show at the NEC a couple of years ago, so thought I would try those...

Yes, they worked very well, at least on the one I tried an hour ago. As the manifold has M10 x 1.5 thread in it I carefully opened up the center hole from 2 mm to 8.5 mm. Then I tapped it out again (really only removing the rest of the bolt of course) - success!

Only three more to go :lol: - but there is no hurry of course, its the end result that is the important thing.

Have a nice evening all.
 

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Hmmmm. Iron cylinder heads? Iron cylinder heads and unleaded petrol? What to do?

For those 'not in the know'. If you have an iron cylinder head. The valve seats were cut directly into the metal. If you had an alloy cylinder head. Hardened seats were fitted. These seats could cope with unleaded fuel (I ran 1970's-1980's Reliant 3-wheelers which had alloy cylinder heads. These just happened to be able to cope with unleaded petrol).

Will you be getting hardened valve seats fitted?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
A bit more work tonight with the drill and ta dah!:



Another small step forwards :smug_git:
 

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Discussion Starter #34
How long has it taken just on that manifold?
In terms of hours, probably only about 2-3 - but that’s been spread over 2-3 days whilst messing around with several other things at the same time.
 
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Discussion Starter #35
Some good progress today, both at work and home.

My mate Tim managed to hold the font disc to hub assemblies in our 4-jaw chuck on the lathe today and skimmed both for me. The Haynes manual said max permissable runout was 0.009" - he got it within 0.006"max, so good job Tim!

Even at that stage they looked so much better:






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Some good progress today, both at work and home.

My mate Tim managed to hold the font disc to hub assemblies in our 4-jaw chuck on the lathe today and skimmed both for me. The Haynes manual said max permissable runout was 0.009" - he got it within 0.006"max, so good job Tim!

Even at that stage they looked so much better:

c1nRKK5.jpg

bV1rBnb.jpg

When I got home I managed to remove the front and rear wheel bearing shells from each with absolutely no problems at all - result.

Then I treated the exposed, rusty surfaces to a light sand and then a coat of high temperature brush on Silver paint. I already had this standing by for the exhaust manifold, so it was an obvious choice.

Hopefully you will agree that they look quite presentable now, plus they should allow the car to roll better and more importantly, stop better too. Obviously I still need to just tidy up the edges a little, but that over-paint will come off easily with a Stanley knife a bit late this evening.





I have a used set of brake disc backing plates on the way to me. Once they arrive they will also be wire brushed and painted Silver. Then I can fit up the new bearings you can see in one of the photos and then hopefully get both front corners buttoned up again.

Have a nice evening all.
 

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Discussion Starter #37

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Discussion Starter #38
Progress has been a bit slow this week due to other bits and pieces to do around the house, but up early this morning and made some progress.

With the newly paint manifolds all dry I refitted (the also painted) warm air take off tin for the air filter housing. Then made sure that the block and manifold faces were nice and clean before using a new gasket and bolting the manifolds back on.







Unfortunately it looks like I must have knocked the round tip of the coolant temperature sensor off while removing the manifolds from the engine bay, so had to order a new one of those - oh well, thats me, Mr Clumsy lol

Next got the vacuum connections and coolant hose all laid out and back on again.

Refitted the carb and associated linkages etc.



Just waiting for the new coolant sensor to arrive, then I can button up the top of drivers side of the engine bay. Then it will be back off underneath to see what needs rectification and/or undersealing before the used downpipe and new center and tail pipe boxes can be fitted.

This is all being done while I am waiting for my used brake backing discs to arrive, then the discs with new bearings can go back on and the car will be mobile again.

Small steps again, but at this time they are all forward... fingers crossed that continues.
 

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Without wishing to lessen the hard work you are putting in, which is commendable, don't you find it so much easier to work on older cars?

You have enough room to actually get at things and can generally get a spanner on the part you want to without removing the rear bumper and working forwards!

I remember changing the engine on my first Triumph Spitfire, took about two hours with my (then) girlfriend. We removed the bonnet, tied the engine to a long piece of wood and simply lifted it out. Happy days, try that with an Audi A6!

Good luck with the rest of the project.
 
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