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Starlight Silver MG TF 135
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have experimented with sticky-backed transparent plastic, using it to divert the water and all the muck picked-up with it, from the mud-trap between metal and wheel-arch liner. For those unfamiliar with this problem area, I am attaching a picture of the area with arch-liner removed:
136862

This was the offending area after I had removed mud etc. just before I squirted/sprayed waxoyl into the sill. Note the hole into the sill area which is normally plugged with a rubber Grommet. No, not the dog!
After replacing a thoroughly cleaned arch-liner (so that the plastic would stick properly,) I cut a piece of sticky-backed plastic (the stuff normally used for covering books - available in WH Smith etc.) to the following shape
136863


I have now done about 60 miles with this in both wheel arches and it seems to be working:
136864


It is important to get a seal on the other edge on the metal, and at the top, which is more difficult as the liner has undulations/corrugations possibly to stiffen the plastic "structure"??. Clearly, this will not last for long, but I could replace it without jacking up the car.

A drainage gap near the base forms naturally, so condensation should not build up behind the plastic.

If anyone thinks this has drawbacks, please let me know! Yes it looks strange and arguably ugly, but with wheels straight ahead, it is hard to know it's there. I prefer slight unsightliness to a build up of mud and cow excrement (lots of that and horse sh1t on our local lanes).
 

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Forgive me, but how is replacing one mud trap with another an improvement?

Apologies if I have misunderstood something.
 

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Starlight Silver MG TF 135
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Perhaps the photos are not clear. Obviously transparent plastic is difficult to photograph. The plastic bridges OVER the place where mud used to be trapped: i.e. the gap between the bottom of the wheel-arch liner and the metal of the lower wheel-arch itself. The result is that water etc. flung backwards and/or upwards by the wheel rotation now hits the plastic, then runs down the plastic all the way until it reaches the very bottom edge of the metal wheel-arch. Provided that nothing gets BEHIND the plastic, NOTHING gets trapped. That is why I emphasised that the top edge of the sticky sheet needs to be carefully attached to the undulating contours of the wheel-arch liner.

I am considering adding some extra transparent plain plastic to the back of the Mk2 version, in order to assist the bridging of the gap where muck used to get trapped, but the single thickness seems to be doing the job O.K. at the moment. When I do remove these "modifications", which I will have to do to remove the arch-liner for top suspension arm re-greasing, I will photograph the old trap region and post how clean or otherwise that area is.

Hope this clarifies.
John E
 

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I've just done mine on the TF...had a dry mud briquette each side..from previous owner; should of done it 4yrs ago when purchased...small amount of corrosion on one side treated sprayed then Bilt Hamber round each wheel arch. What you are trying to do is commendable but if rust is treated and 'body re painted there is no real problem...your idea may well trap even more moisture and cause even more problems. Just clean out debris when washing car and behind liners each year?
 

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Starlight Silver MG TF 135
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I take your point, and I will certainly remove the plastic film before laying-up the car over winter. I have done everything I can to ensure that the area behind the film can "breathe", with an open gap right at the base. I intend to keep the film in-place over the next few months and monitor for condensation. It IS keeping muck and water away from the classic dirt-trap gap between liner and steel.
 

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A good idea in principle, I've noticed the mud-trap too, but it will stand or fall by the implementation details. For instance, does the sticky-backed plastic itself tend to trap any moisture where it is stuck to the metal? That mud trap is a concerning area, always wet.
In the same vein I was fed up with light rust spreading from the inside of my wheel arches towards the outside. The old tin worm tracks always seemed to start on the sharp inner edge of each wheel arch so I treated and resprayed the inside of the wheel arches then got some thin black rubber U-channel gasket off ebay and cut it to length so each piece would fit right around the inner metal edge of each wheel arch, then I cleaned the edge well, squirted black urethane rubber sealant into the U-channel and clamped it in place around the arch rim with pegs while the sealant cured. I also used masking tape so I could smooth the sealant oozing out from the U-channel.
So far (two years) I'm pleased to say no rust can be seen trying to escape from the rubber channels which seem still well stuck on, but if I hadn't sealed them in position well with flexible sealant, they could turn into water traps and actually accelerate rusting! People may say that just the paint should be enough, but paint tends to go thin on sharp edges and suffers stress cracking, plus when removing the arch liners I've never found a way that they didn't scrape the inner edges of the wheel arch, presumably damaging the paint anyway.
 

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May I ask what protection the F has around the wheel arch rims? I wasn't aware the F had anything different to the TF, which has nothing but a coat of paint for protection on the wheel arch rims..
 

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PS: I'm not talking about the wheel arch liner. The TF has arch liners, on the front arches at least. It doesn't really do anything to prevent rust of the wheel arch inner rim. I see an item called a 'protection strip - wing edge' for the F on Rimmers but it doesn't really indicate where it goes!
 

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PS: I'm not talking about the wheel arch liner. The TF has arch liners, on the front arches at least. It doesn't really do anything to prevent rust of the wheel arch inner rim. I see an item called a 'protection strip - wing edge' for the F on Rimmers but it doesn't really indicate where it goes!
It literally just pushes onto the return of the arch. Sadly, it’s too dark to get a decent photo of them now - I think anyway...

Might go and try in a minute.

OK maybe I was wrong - see here:
136872
 

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Thanks very much! I basically reinvented that for my TF! Right, that's another corner they cut on the TF!
Here's a picture of my attempt - the channel is black against a sort of indigo blue so not as visible as in your F pic. Had I known I would have tried to source the F rim protectors but I've a feeling they're no longer available.
136873
1626471513039.png
1626471513039.png
 

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I would have thought it would be pretty easy to source a few meters of a very similar profile from an EBay Seller.

You just need to look for door, boot and glass seals.
 
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Starlight Silver MG TF 135
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
An update on my Mud-Trap Prevention device:

200 + miles with these fitted, and there is now enough dried-on dirt on them for photos to show more clearly how they are working:
136903


I inserted the tail of a small clamp into the "designed-in" but largely inevitable, Drainage/ventilation gap to help show that this gap exists! This drain hole prevents any build-up of moisture BEHIND the plastic film. As nocturnblue rightly said:
A good idea in principle, I've noticed the mud-trap too, but it will stand or fall by the implementation details. For instance, does the sticky-backed plastic itself tend to trap any moisture where it is stuck to the metal? That mud trap is a concerning area, always wet.
In my opinion, the vital details in the implementation are ensuring that there IS a drain hole as shown above, and taking care to get a good, continuous seal at the top:
136904

The top edge of my plastic film is between the green lines in the photo above (sorry about the poor focus).

Note that there is an inevitable gap which I have circled in red. Perhaps this was meant to be, it does allow air (but hopefully very little water) to enter and thus encourages ventilation behind the plastic. When I remove this Mk1 version in the winter lay-up, I will check if anything has entered the old Mud-Trap area.

It occurs to me that the edging strip which Flanners and IanMc report on their F's and the similar strip nocturneblue has added to his TF metal arch edges, might fill the gap between metal and plastic wheel-arch liner, thus closing-up the gap I have circled in red. I feel sure that an optimal solution to this much reported mud trap area is yet to be perfected, but I think I am on the right track and not just substituting a "new" mud trap for the original offender.
New ideas/alternatives/ criticisms welcome as always.
John E
 

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The edge stripe used on the Fs is great. On the side that is against the wheel arch lines, there is a quarter moon rubber bead that presses against the liner, helping to improve the seal. I don't know a source of this trim.
SAM_3887.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The edge stripe used on the Fs is great. On the side that is against the wheel arch lines, there is a quarter moon rubber bead that presses against the liner, helping to improve the seal. I don't know a source of this trim. View attachment 136905
Yep! That looks like the correct way to close the gap which allows water/mud/sh1t mixtures to get into the gap all around the wheel-arch which exists on my TF. Shame Rover decided to penny-pinch when the TF was introduced! This partially explains why far more TF owners suffer rusting wheel arches. I would be interested to see if there was any reduction in mud build-up at the bottom rear edge of the wheel arches on F's versus TFs
136906

Above is the area I am talking about with liner removed, muck cleaned-out and before Waxoyl.
 
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